> Best blogg: Windows 8
Showing posts with label Windows 8. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Windows 8. Show all posts

Sunday, August 9, 2015

Enable desable WiFi in Windows 8

ou take your new Windows 8 PC to a coffee shop. You’ve just set up wireless Internet at home. Or you’re one of the lucky ones who has Wi-Fi on a plane. So how do you connect to and manage your laptop’s Wi-Fi connections from Windows 8?

In the past, you’d click on the connection icon in the lower-right corner (this group of icons is called the Notification Area). Then, you’d choose a wireless network and connect from there.
Luckily, you can still do that in Windows 8. Just press Windows + D to go to the Windows 8 desktop, and you should see the familiar connection icon in the lower right. Click on it, and you’ll see a brand-new pane slide into view from the right side.

Enable WiFi Connections
This is the connection pane.
But what if you’d like to manage wireless connections from the Start Screen? Here’s how to do that.
  1. Press the Windows Key to go to the Start Screen
  2. Move the mouse to the bottom-right corner to see a few icons start to appear. Then move the mouse upward. These set of icons are called the Charm Bar
  3. Click Settings
  4. Click the Network icon. You’ll see the same pane as above slide into view

Enable WiFi Connections
Click the Network icon.
At the top is Airplane Mode. Those with a smartphone or tablet will be familiar with this setting. It disables all Wi-Fi connections and saves a lot of battery life … useful when your laptop is aboard a plane that doesn’t have Wi-Fi, or for landing and take-off. Also, you don’t have to use Airplane Mode when on a plane. There are lots of times where you’ll want to turn Wi-Fi off … such as when you’re connected to the Internet via cable.
Next up is your Connections. Here you’ll see an icon with a cable next to it if you’re connected to a hardline, or a series of bars if you’re connected to Wi-Fi. The shaded bars show your connection strength, with five being the highest.
Below that are the Wi-Fi connections available in your area. Find the one appropriate to you and click on it.
If you can select the Connect Automatically check box, your PC will connect to that source every time it’s in range. Then, click Connect. You may need to enter a password, depending on the connection.

Enable WiFi Connections
You can choose to connect automatically.
You can also disconnect from Wi-Fi or connect to a different location from this same screen.

Wednesday, August 5, 2015

How to change user account name in Windows 8.1

When you first install Windows, it prompts you to create a user account and choose a name for it. This becomes your logon name (also called as the user name). Windows also creates a separate display name for you. If you type your full name when creating an account, Windows creates a logon name based on the first name and your full name is stored as the display name. You can easily change your display name from the User Accounts Control Panel but what about the logon name? You can change the logon name too without having to create a new user account but the way to change it isn't so obvious. Here is how to do it.


Several years ago, when Windows XP was released, it featured a new Welcome screen with avatars and a user list. It was friendlier for people who were not familiar with earlier versions of Windows, where you had to type your logon name as well as the password.

The Welcome screen still exists in modern versions of Windows. It shows a list of users with their display name, which is different from the logon name. The display name is usually the first and last name in case of an individual, but it can be anything, and can include special characters like " / \ [ ] : ; | = , + * ? < >. The logon name can't include these special characters. In Windows XP, there was an option to choose between the Welcome screen and the classic style logon. In newer Windows versions, the classic style of logon is made less prominent (it can be enabled using Group Policy).

There are several cases where you might need to view or change your logon name. For example, in an enterprise network, you need to know it to sign in to Active Directory. Depending on the devices you have and your home network setup, the logon name may be required to access various network shares or administrative resources on another PC. If you need to change it, follow these simple instructions.
  1. Run File Explorer.
  2. Right click the This PC icon in the navigation pane and select Manage from its context menu:
    manage
  3. The Computer Management window will appear on the screen. In the left pane, expand the tree nodes to go to Computer Management -> System Tools -> Local Users and Groups -> Users.
    local users and groups In the screenshot above, you can see that my actual logon name (user account name) is st, but the logon screen of Windows 8.1 shows the display name, which is 'Sergey Tkachenko'.
  4. Select the user name from the list in the right pane, right click it and choose Rename.
    rename
  5. The first column of the user list will become editable, so you can specify a new logon name:
    new login name   Press Enter. Now you can close Computer Management.
That's it. As you can see, it is very easy to change your logon name. This is an old, well known trick and is also applicable to very old versions of Windows such as Windows 2000. But ever since Windows XP, the User Accounts Control Panel only lets you change the user name. You need to use Local Users and Groups MMC snap-in or the Advanced User Accounts Control Panel (netplwiz.exe) to change the logon name.

Saturday, January 17, 2015

How to find your Wi-Fi password in Windows 8.1

This happens to me often, especially when I'm visiting relatives' houses: My computer knows the Wi-Fi password from when I last connected to the network -- two years ago -- but I've completely forgotten it, though my mother is about 65 percent sure she wrote it down on a Post-it note seven months ago.
A forgotten Wi-Fi password isn't a problem for me and my omniscient laptop, but it is a problem for, say, my brother, who needs the password if he wants to jump on the network with his Japanese iPhone. My mom is hunting for the Post-it, but prospects are lookin' bleak.

Luckily, there's an easy way to reverse-lookup your Wi-Fi password on a computer that already technically knows it. Here's how to find saved network passwords in Windows 8.1:

Step 1: Make sure you're connected to your Wi-Fi network. If you're not connected, open the Charms bar by swiping in from the right side of the screen, or by moving your mouse into the upper right corner of the screen, and click Settings. Tap or click the network icon, find your network and click Connect.

Your PC should connect to your Wi-Fi network automatically, with the saved (but forgotten) password.
Step 2: From the desktop, open the Charms bar, click Settings and then open the Control Panel.
Step 3: Under Network and Internet, click View network status and tasks.

Step 4: Next to the word Connections, you should see a Wi-Fi icon and the name of your Wi-Fi network. Click your Wi-Fi network and a Wi-Fi Status window will pop up. Click Wireless Properties.
Step 5: A new window will pop up. Tap or click the Security tab and you will see your Network security key displayed as a series of black dots. Check the box next to Show characters and voila -- there's your Wi-Fi password!

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

How to run Windows XP programs in Windows Vista, Windows 7 and Windows 8


How to run Windows XP programs in Windows Vista, Windows 7 and Windows 8

How to run Windows XP programs in Windows Vista, Windows 7 and Windows 8

Microsoft has killed support for Windows XP, but that doesn't mean you have to get rid of all your old software. Here we show you how to run Windows XP programs in Windows Vista, Windows 7 and Windows 8. Also see: Windows 10 hands-on review and Windows 10 release date, price and new features.

If you still have a few legacy applications that require Windows XP or you just want to test a program to make sure it works on the legacy operating system, it’s relatively simple to install and run it in a virtual PC environment. Also see: How to install a virtual machine.

Windows XP is no longer available to buy and although there are illegal copies to be found circulating the internet, you can download a pre-built virtual PC directly from Microsoft, which you can be confident will be malware-free. Microsoft provides these virtual machines to help developers test old versions of Internet Explorer, but they provide a full XP environment in which you can run any programs you wish.

Virtual PCs are available for a number of platforms, but we’ll use Oracle’s free VirtualBox software in this example. Once you have VirtualBox installed and working, go to modern.ie and select ‘VirtualBox on Windows’, then scroll down to Windows XP. Download the three files listed under IE8 and save them to a folder on your hard drive. Once they have downloaded, run the file called part1.exe and it will extract a file called IE8 – WinXP.OVA. Double-click this file to import it into VirtualBox and your Windows XP virtual PC will be installed.

You can now launch Windows XP from within VirtualBox and install any software you wish. The operating system is time limited to 30 days, but it’s possible to activate it for permanent use if you are in possession of a valid key


tags:

How to run Windows XP programs in Windows Vista, Windows 7 and Windows 8

Friday, April 4, 2014

free ebook Windows 8 for Dummies

This is one of the most popular eBook guides on Windows 8 that you can find on the Web. It is published by the guys behind the For Dummies reference series, together with Dell and Microsoft. This is a reference guide for all sorts of Window 8 devices including brand new Windows 8 touchscreen devices and laptops or desktop PCs.
               Download free book Windows 8 for Dummies

Tuesday, February 4, 2014

How To Reset a Windows 8 Password

 lost your password?

How To Reset a Windows 8 Password

haw to reset your Windows 8 password?. In fact, as long as you can closely follow the detailed instructions outlined below, it's not even that difficult.
How To Reset a Windows 8 PasswordThe "hack" outlined below is harmless and works very well but it's not exactly Microsoft-sanctioned. Ideally you'd use a Windows 8 password reset disk haw to reset your Windows 8 password. Unfortunately, the only way to use one of those is if you had the forethought to create one before forgetting your password! I do recommend you make one as soon as you get back in (see Step 10 below).
Important: The Windows 8 password reset trick below only works if you're using a local account. If you use an email address to logon to Windows 8 then you're not using a local account, you're using a Microsoft account, and you should follow my How To Reset Your Microsoft Account Password tutorial instead.
Some other ways also exist to recover or reset a forgotten Windows 8 password, like using password recovery software. See my Help! I Forgot My Windows 8 Password! for the full list of ideas.
Follow these easy steps to reset your Windows 8 password:
Difficulty: Average
Time Required: Considering that there are several steps involved, it might take up to an hour to reset your Windows 8 password.
Applies To: You can reset your Windows 8 password this way no matter what edition of Windows 8 or Windows 8.1 you're using.
Here's How:
  1. Access Advanced Startup Options. In Windows 8, all of the important diagnostic and repair options available to you can be found on the Advanced Startup Options (ASO) menu.

    Important: There are six ways to access the ASO menu, all described in the link above, but some are only available if you can already get into Windows 8, which you can't do since you don't know the password. I recommend following Method 4, which requires that you have a Windows 8 setup disc or flash drive, or Method 5, which requires that you have, or create, a Windows 8 Recovery Drive. Method 6 works too, if your computer supports it.
     
  2. Touch or click on Troubleshoot, then Advanced options, and finally Command Prompt.
     
  3. Now that Command Prompt is open, type the following command:
    copy c:\windows\system32\utilman.exe c:\
    
    ...and then press Enter. You should see a 1 file(s) copied confirmation.
     
  4. Next, type this command, again followed by Enter:
    copy c:\windows\system32\cmd.exe c:\windows\system32\utilman.exe
    
    Answer with Y or Yes to question about the overwrite of the utilman.exe file. You should now see another file copy confirmation.
     
  5. Remove any flash drives or discs that you may have booted from in Step 1 and then restart your computer.
     
  6. Once the Windows 8 logon screen is available, click the Ease of Access icon at the bottom-left corner of the screen. Command Prompt should now open.

    What?! Command Prompt? That's right! The changes you made in Step 3 & 4 above replaced the Ease of Access tools with Command Prompt (don't worry, you'll reverse these changes in Step 11). Now that you have access to a command line, you can reset your Windows 8 password.
     
  7. Next you need to execute the net user command as shown below, replacing myusername with your user name, and mynewpassword with the password you'd like to begin using:
    net user myusername mynewpassword
    
    For example, on my computer, I would execute the command like this:
    net user "Tim Fisher" a@rdvarksar3skarY
    
    Note: You only need to use double quotes around your username if it happens to have a space in it.

    Tip: If you get a The user name could not be found message, execute net user to see the list of Windows 8 users on the computer for reference and then try again with a valid username. A System error 8646 / The system is not authoritative for the specified account... message indicates that you're using a Microsoft account to login to Windows 8, not a local account. See the Important call-out in the introduction at the top of this page for more on that.
     
  8. Close Command Prompt.
     
  9. Login with the new password you set in Step 7!
     
  10. Now that your Windows 8 password has been reset and you're back in, either create a Windows 8 password reset disk or switch your local account to a Microsoft account. No matter which you choose, you'll finally have legitimate, and much easier to use, Windows 8 password reset options.
     
  11. Finally, you should reverse the hack that makes this password reset trick work in Windows 8. To do that, repeat Steps 1 & 2 above.

    Once Command Prompt is open again, execute this command:
    copy c:\utilman.exe c:\windows\system32\utilman.exe
    
    Confirm the overwriting by answering Yes and then restart your computer.

How To Reset a Windows 8 Password


 

Reset a Windows 8 Password

How To Reset a Windows 7 Password

Sunday, February 2, 2014

Where Can I Download Windows 8 or 8.1?

 Where Can I Download Windows 8 or 8.1?
Where Can I get Windows 8 or 8.1?

Where Can I Download Windows 8 or 8.1?

Where Can I Download Windows 8 or 8.1?

Where Can I Download Windows 8 or 8.1?

 
There are any number of reasons why someone might want to download Windows 8, or maybe the newer Windows 8.1. Most obviously, if you don't have Windows 8, getting your hands on the operating system via a download is much easier than buying a boxed copy.
Even if you already have Windows 8 on a computer, most manufacturers don't include a copy, making a clean install of Windows 8 or 8.1 pretty much impossible, as well some kinds of troubleshooting that having a copy of Windows 8 available makes a lot easier.
Finally, maybe you just want to give it a try on a spare computer or on a virtual machine. You've seen the prices for Windows 8 and it isn't cheap. There are probably free copies of Windows 8 floating around somewhere, right?
Answer: There are several ways to download Windows 8 and Windows 8.1 online, the majority of them completely legal and directly from Microsoft. There is a Windows 8 trial option, as well as some not-so-legal methods of downloading Windows 8, all of which I discuss below.
Note: If you do have a copy of Windows 8 or 8.1 (in ISO format or on a disc or flash drive) and also have that copy of Windows 8 installed and working but you've lost your product key, there may be a way to find it. See How To Find Your Windows 8 or 8.1 Product Key for help.

Download Windows 8 & 8.1 the Legal Way

There are four, completely legal ways to download a full copy of Windows 8.1.
The first method applies only to students (as well as faculty & staff) with valid .edu email addresses and is pretty straightforward: purchase and download Windows 8.1 Pro from Microsoft for only $69.99 USD. It's as simple as that. You'll get a copy of Windows 8.1 in ISO format, ready for burning to a disc or transferring to a USB device.
The second method is identical in process but without the deep discount. Purchase and download from Microsoft either Windows 8.1 for $119.99 USD or Windows 8.1 Pro for $199.99 USD. Boxed copies are also available if you'd rather.
Windows 8 vs Windows 8.1: If you're new to Windows 8, purchasing Windows 8.1 (Windows 8 with the 8.1 update already included) is probably the smartest choice. Sometimes you can find a less expensive boxed copy of Windows 8 (before the 8.1 update) from retailers like TigerDirect, NewEgg, (and others), which you can then update to Windows 8.1 for free after installation.
Your third option is to download Windows 8.1 or Windows 8 for "free" as part of a paid MSDN Subscription, costing $699 USD per year for a new subscription, or $499 USD if you're renewing. This is a professional subscription program available for purchase by anyone, but designed for software developers. You get access to all full versions of Windows 8 & 8.1, including valid product keys, in addition to software and keys for almost every software and operating system Microsoft has ever created.
The MSDN program is anything but cheap. Unless you're an software developer or some other professional IT person that needs access to multiple operating systems, an MSDN subscription probably isn't a cost effective ways to legally download Windows 8.
Your fourth and final option is to download, for free, a copy of Windows 8.1 Enterprise. Yes, of course there's a catch: after 90-days, your computer will begin to shut down every hour and will continue to do so until you replace the operating system. In other words, this is a trial version of Windows 8.1, designed for hardware and software developers to test their products on. This might be useful if you need very short term access to Windows 8.1 but it's not a long term solution.
Note: If you already have a Windows 8 or 8.1 disc or ISO and are only trying to download Windows 8 because you need to install it on a computer without an optical drive, there is a way to get the files from the disc or ISO onto a flash drive. See How To Install Windows 8 or 8.1 From USB for a complete tutorial.

Other "Free" Windows 8 & 8.1 Downloads

Any other free or incredibly inexpensive Windows 8 or 8.1 download you find online is almost certainly illegal, including Windows 8 ISO files you might find on torrent sites. Legal issues aside, these Windows 8 downloads, unlike the official ones from Microsoft, run the very serious risk of containing a surprise or two.
For example, a number of Windows 8 & 8.1 downloads available from unofficial sources are "cracked" versions of Windows 8 installation discs. By "cracked" I mean that they've been changed for one reason or another and could easily contain malware. It would be very unfortunate to install Windows 8 on your computer and be automatically infected with a virus.
Important: Please know that when you pay for Windows 8, what you're actually paying for is the product key used to activate Windows 8. In other words, even if you do download Windows 8 from someone other than Microsoft, you'll still need a valid Windows 8 product key to use the operating system.

Don't Download Windows 8: Replace It

A much better option for those of you with lost or broken, but valid, copies of Windows 8 or 8.1 is to order replacement media. In your case, there's no reason to pay full price for another copy of Windows 8 or risk being infected with malware.
If Windows 8 came preinstalled on your computer, and you did have DVD or flash media but now it's damaged or lost, contact your computer maker for a replacement. Depending on their policy, your computer maker may provide you with Windows 8 media for free or a small fee.
If you legitimately purchased and downloaded Windows 8 from Microsoft, you can download Windows 8 or 8.1 again here, so long as you have your product key documented.
If you purchased a retail Windows 8 DVD, you can contact the Microsoft Supplemental Parts team and request a replacement.
While not a replacement for Windows 8, please know that you also have the option to create a Recovery Drive for Windows 8 using a friend's Windows 8 PC, all for the cost of a small flash drive. Your Recovery Drive can be used to perform all the diagnostic and repair functions that a full copy of Windows 8 can. See How To Create a Windows 8 or 8.1 Recovery Drive for instructions.

 Where Can I Download Windows 8 or 8.1?
Where Can I get Windows 8 or 8.1?

Wednesday, January 29, 2014

How to create a bootable Windows 8.1 USB drive


How to create a bootable Windows 8.1 USB drive
In keeping up with tradition, Microsoft has launched Windows 8.1 in both digital and physical form. Users can install the new operating system by using either a downloaded ISO file or the provided DVD. But what happens when neither option is right for you? You can use a USB drive.
There are a number of major benefits to using a USB drive for this process. It's compatible with virtually every device that is meant to run Windows, forgoes the need to have a spare DVD and the burner around and is much easier to store and carry with you wherever you may go. A USB drive can also be faster than any DVD, shortening the time needed for the install, and, chances are, you probably already have one lying around. Also, compared to ISO files which can only be leveraged from Windows, USB drives can be used with no software installed on the device.

Requirements
 
To create a bootable Windows 8.1 USB drive you will need the following:
  • 4 GB or larger USB drive;
  • Windows 8.1 DVD, ISO file or product key;
  • A device that is running Windows.
What If I Have a Windows 8 Product Key?

If you have a Windows 8 product key, you can download the Windows 8.1 ISO file directly from Microsoft's servers, and create a bootable USB drive as well. My colleague Wayne Williams has already written a guide which details all the steps that you have to go through. Please note that you need a Windows PC for this task.

How Does the Windows 8.1 Product Key Help?

Obviously, you cannot install Windows 8.1 using just the product key. But, you can use it to download the ISO file directly from Microsoft's servers. Please note that the default Windows partition (usually "C") has to have at least 5 GB of free storage. You will have to follow these steps next:
  1. Download and open the Install Windows 8.1 setup file from Microsoft;
  2. Type in your Windows 8.1 product key and initiate the download;
  3. After the download completes, select Install by creating media;
  4. Select USB flash drive (it should be the default choice) and insert the USB drive;
  5. Accept any prompts to erase the contents of the USB drive in order to kick off the process.
If you prefer a visual step-by-step guide, you can look at the screenshots posted below.

Step 1: Install Windows ADK for Windows 8.1

  1. Download  Windows ADK for Windows 8.1
     
  2. Install Windows ADK for Windows 8.1 on a IT Admin of lab workstation by running adksetup.exe

    NOTE:
    Run the following command line: adksetup.exe /layout "C:\Setup\Windows ADK 8.1" should the desire be to download Windows ADK for Windows 8.1 only.

     
  3. Select the following components during the Windows ADK for Windows 8.1 setup:
     
    • Deployment Tools
       
    • Windows Pre-installation Environment (Windows PE)
       
    • User State Migration Tool (USMT)
       
Step 2: Install Microsoft Deployment Toolkit 2013
 

  1. Download Microsoft Deployment Toolkit 2013
     
  2. Install Microsoft Deployment Toolkit 2013 on the same IT Admin of lab workstation  

Step 3: Creating a Deployment Share

  1. Run Deployment Workbench
     
  2. Right-click Deployment Shares and select New Deployment Share
     
  3. Select the following options in the New Deployment Share Wizard: 
    • Deployment share path: C:\MDTLab
       
    • Share name: MDTLab$
       
    • Deployment share description: MDT Lab
       
    • Options: <default settings>
       
Step 4: Import the Windows 8.1 OS

  1. Download the Windows 8.1 Enterprise x64 ISO 
     
  2. Extract the ISO to the C:\Setup\Windows 8.1 Enterprise x64 folder. Create the folders should they not exist.
     
  3. In the Deployment Workbench, expand the Deployment Shares node.
     
  4. Expand MDT Lab, and select the Operating Systems node.
     
  5. Select Import Operating System.
     
  6. Select the following settings for the Import Operating System Wizard:
     
    • Full set of source files
       
    • Source directory: C:\Setup\Windows 8.1 Enterprise x64
       
    • Destination directory name: WIN81X64
       
  7. After adding the OS, in the Operating System node, change the operating system name to Windows 8.1 Enterprise x64.
     
Step 5: Importing Necessary Applications
 

One of the advantages of utilizing MDT 2013 to create the image for the USB key is the ability to include drivers and / or applications that are specific to your organization's needs. In this example, Microsoft's Calculator Plus, will be added to this image.  Feel free to customize it as you see fit.
 

  1. Download Microsoft Calculator Plus
     
  2. Copy CalcPlus.msi to C:\Setup\MSCalcPlus on the IT Admin of lab workstation.
     
  3. In the Deployment Workbench, in the MDT Lab node, select Applications.
     
  4. Right-click the Applications folder, and select New Application.
     
  5. Select the following settings to be used in the New Application Wizard:

    • Application with source files
       
    • Publisher: <blank>
       
    • Application name: Microsoft Calculator Plus
       
    • Version: <blank>
       
    • Language: <blank>
       
    • Source Directory: C:\Setup\MSCalcPlus
       
    • Specify the name of the directory that should be created:  Microsoft Calculator Plus
       
    • Command Line: msiexec /I CalcPlus.msi /q
       
    • Working directory: <default>
       
Repeat this process as many time as required to include all the pertinent applications required.

Step 6: Create and Configure a Task Sequence

  1. Using the Deployment Workbench in the MDT Lab share,  select the Task Sequences node.
     
  2. Right-click the Task Sequences node, and select New Task Sequence.
     
  3. Select the following settings for the New Task Sequence Wizard:
     
    • Task sequence ID: W8-X64-001
       
    • Task sequence name: Windows 8.1 Enterprise x64
       
    • Task sequence comments: <blank>
       
    • Template: Standard Client Task Sequence
       
    • Select OS: Windows 8.1 Enterprise x64
       
    • Specify Product Key: Do not specify a product key at this time
       
    • FullName: CANITPRO
       
    • Organization: CANITPRO
       
    • Internet Explorer home page: http://www.canitpro.net
       
    • Do not specify an Administrator password at this time
       
Step 7: Create the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit 2013 Media

  1. In File Explorer, create the C:\MDTMedia folder.
     
  2. In the Deployment Workbench, via the MDT Lab / Advanced Configuration node, select the Media node.
     
  3. Right-click the Media node, and select New Media.
     
  4. Select the following settings within the New Media Wizard:
     
    • Media path: C:\MDTMedia
       
    • Selection profile: <default>
       
  5. Open and edit the C:\MDTMedia\Content\Deploy\Control\Bootstrap.ini in Notepad, and in the Default section, add the SkipBDDWelcome=YES option. This will quicken the deployment  by automating the welcome parts.

    NOTE: Right-click the MEDIA001 media, select Properties, and clear either the x86 and x64 option depending on what you are deploying to avoid the selection of x86 and x64 boot images when starting the media (set by default).
     
  6. To create the media, right-click the MEDIA001 media, and select Update Media Content
     
  7. Once completed, the Update Media Content process now generates the offline media in the C:\MDTMedia folder
     
  8. To create the bootable USB key, copy the content of the MDTMedia\Content folder to the root of the USB key.
     
  9. Next use diskpart to make the USB key active.

Once the steps above are completed, an IT professional can now utilize the newly created USB Key to deploy Windows 8.1.

While the drivers included with Windows 8.1 should suffice, additional drivers can be added to the USB key should the hardware being deployed to not be supported by default.  Driver inclusion can be configured via MDT 2013 and will be included on a future post.

Red more 

How to Create a Bootable Windows 7 or Vista USB Drive

dual-boot Windows 8 and Linux

Installing Windows8 using USB Drive and Dual Booting on Windows 7

Monday, January 20, 2014

How to Uninstall Windows 8-Install Windows 7 on Your PC




How to Uninstall Windows 8-Install Windows 7 on Your PC



If you're fed up with the Windows 8 operating system that came on your new laptop, and just want to switch back to Windows 7, I've got good news, and bad news. The good news is that it is possible. You can remove Windows 8, install Windows 7, and go about your life as if Windows 8 never happened. The bad news is that it's a complicated endeavor.

In addition to the expected BIOS wrangling, drive formatting, and reinstalling device drivers, Microsoft has actually added extra layers of complexity. The BIOS has the added obstacle of the Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI). Drives are partitioned and protected so that it's difficult to reclaim all of the space on your hard drive. And finally, manufacturers are spotty at best when it comes to offering Windows 7 drivers and rarely support users in making the switch. The result is a snarled Gordian Knot of complications, but there's not necessarily a sword available to simplify the issue. This guide, however, should help you navigate the many twists and turns.

If you don't want to remove Windows 8 completely but still want to have your familiar Windows 7 experience, want to avoid compatibility issues with programs and games, or need a feature that's gone missing in the new OS, there are other options. Your best bet is actually running Windows 7 on a virtual machine—and we can suggest several.

If you're ready to embark on the journey back to Windows 7—it feels wrong to simply call it a downgrade—then gather your supplies, muster your courage, and let's dive in.

A Few Words of Warning

Microsoft does offer downgrade rights, complete with support services and a clear downgrade path to Windows 7, but only for systems with Windows 8 Pro. If you've just got plain old Windows 8—and most mainstream systems do—you're on your own. Switching between the two operating systems is still very doable, but you'll be doing it without Microsoft's blessing.

Related to this, you may also run into trouble getting support from your manufacturer, as most do not provide legacy support for Windows 7 on systems that were factory-shipped with Windows 8. This extends to drivers. You'll need to do your homework as to what your devices are, what drivers they require, and whether or not there are Windows 7 drivers available. Unfortunately, this will vary from model to model, and even from one configuration to the next.


Start by opening the device manager in your control panel. It will provide you with a list of all the different devices found on the system, from touchpad and keyboard to networking and Wi-Fi adapters. Don't skip this step, because you can't use the device without a working driver—meaning that without the proper drivers, you can easily find yourself stuck with a nearly unusable machine.

By digging into the properties of each device individually, you should be able to find the specific part model name, and information about the drivers. Some searching online will help you discover whether or not Windows 7 drivers are available for each part, but you will often need to track do each driver individually. The one exception to this is when the manufacturer offers two versions of the same model PC—both a Windows 8 configuration, and a Windows 7 version

The first place to check is the PC manufacturer's product support page. By looking up your specific PC model number, you should be able to locate a list of all the needed drivers for the laptop's hardware. If you're lucky, the manufacturer support page includes drivers for both Windows 8 and Windows 7, giving you everything you need for your entire PC. With one of our test PCs, this was all we needed to do, because all the device drivers were available.

If not, you'll need to take it one device at a time. Find the name of the manufacturer for each device and search for that company's website, which should have its own driver download page. If even this doesn't seem to help, you can always fire up your search engine and search for "[Device name] + Windows 7 Driver." That should bring up plenty of resources.

Be aware, however, that for some newer devices, drivers may not be available for Windows 7 and older operating systems. If this is the case, you may be out of luck—which is why you're looking all of this up beforehand.
Backing Up

Back up everything. Tech journalists often preach the importance of regularly backing up, but this is more than the usual preparation against hypothetical disaster—you're about to overwrite your hard drive. Everything on that drive will be gone. Files, programs, and the original operating system, all gone. Just because you want to ditch Windows 8 now doesn't mean you won't change your mind in the future. Additionally, you may want a way to revert back to Windows 8 should you ever need to take advantage of the warranty—there's worry that some manufacturers will void the warranty on the system if Win 8 is removed.

What You Need

First, you'll need Windows 7 installation media, either on disc or on a USB Key. Yes, Microsoft still sells it, as does Amazon. In addition to your installation media, you'll need a valid Windows 7 Product Key, the 25-digit alphanumeric code used to activate your copy of Windows. If you're installing from a brand-new copy of Windows, you're fine to use the product key that was included, but if you're using an older copy (or a copy of a copy) you'll need to pay for a new valid key.

You will also need a USB key (separate from your installation media) with drivers loaded on it. This is the result of the aforementioned homework—you really don't want to install Windows 7 without it.



windows 8 Open Settings by going to the Charms Bar and clicking on the Gear icon.

windows 8 Go to "Change PC Settings" at the bottom right corner of the screen, below the icons. On the left, scroll down and select "General Settings." On the right, scroll down through the settings options to find "Advanced Options."

Back to Windows 7 - UEFI Firmware Settings This will close out of the standard Metro interface and open up a blue screen with several tiles. Select "UEFI Firmware Settings"—you may need to first select "Tools and Settings" and then "Advance Options"—and then follow the prompt to restart and change settings.

Back to Windows 7 - Boot Options Upon rebooting, the system should produce a startup menu. Select "BIOS setup." Under the "System Configuration" tab, find "Boot Options." (In some instances, Boot Options will instead be found under the "Security" tab.)

Back to Windows 7 - Secure Boot/Legacy Support Once into the Boot Options menu, you will first find "Secure Boot" and disable it. Still in the Boot Options menu, find "Legacy Boot" and change it to enabled. You will now be able to boot into your Windows 7 installation media. Depending upon whether you will be installing it from a disc or a USB key, you will want to change the Legacy Boot Order so that either the optical drive or USB device take priority. Finally, exit the BIOS, saving changes. 


 
Commence Installing Windows 7
With Legacy Boot enabled and your boot order changed, you should now be able to boot into your installation media to begin installing Windows 7.

Back to Windows 7 - Install Start
The first thing you'll see is a prompt to begin installation. Back to Windows 7 - Language
Back to Windows 7 - License

Start the installation process, choose your language and region, and press "Install Now" to begin the process. Back to Windows 7 - Custom Installation

You'll be asked to agree to Microsoft's software license, and then to choose between an Upgrade or Custom installation. In this instance, you'll want to choose Custom. Back to Windows 7 - Drive Partitions

The next step is to choose the destination drive for the installed OS. At the very least, you'll want to install Windows 7 to your C: drive. If you want to wipe Windows 8 completely off of your system, this is the time to do it. Select the various partitions on the hard drive and go through the process of deleting each, and consolidating the free space. This all handled in the installer, which gives you the option to delete or format each partition as it's selected. But beware—this is the Rubicon of OS installation. Once those drives are gone, they are gone, and rebooting the system without finishing the Windows 7 installation will leave you with a PC that has no operating system. Next, the installer will go through the process of extracting and expanding all of the necessary installation folders. Kick back and relax for a while, because this part is automatic. During this process, the PC will also restart on its own—don't panic, that's just part of the installation process.
Back to Windows 7 - Finished
Finally, your laptop will boot into Windows, and you should see a more familiar version of the Windows logo come up.
Once you boot into Windows, you'll be asked to provide a 25-digit Product Key. You can proceed without one, but you'll be forever hounded by warnings about using a pirated version of Windows, even if it's a brand new store-bought copy.

Install Drivers from USB key

Once you've got Windows 7 installed on your system, it's time to install your drivers. As a rule, I always start by installing networking drivers—once you've got your Wi-Fi or Ethernet connection up and running, you can hunt down the rest and troubleshoot online as needed.
Once you've got your drivers installed for everything else (trackpad, graphics processing, USB 3.0 ports, Bluetooth, etc.) do one final reboot. Viola! You've now got a pristine Windows 7 PC, ready and waiting for all of your software and files.

Hopefully, this little guide has helped you to navigate the minefield of switching from Windows 8 to Windows 7 without the loss of a limb. Enjoy your Start Menu, and bask in the light of a tile-free existence, free to use Windows as you always have. With any luck, the next version of Windows will be a little easier to adjust to.


How to Uninstall Windows 8, Install Windows 7 on Your PC





 source : http://www.pcmag.com/

tags: Wi-Fi ,install Windows 7, windows, Windows 8, Uninstall Windows 8, How to Uninstall Windows 8, Install Windows 7 on Your PC,  Back to Windows 7



 



Saturday, January 18, 2014

How to Install Windows 8

  • haw to install Windows 8? Soluto guides you through it in 7 simple step



    Step 1: Ingredients

    How to install Windows 8
    Before you can get the first taste of Windows 8, you’ll need to gather the following ingredients:

    1 PC; Internet connection; 1 blank DVD; 1 DVD burner; M&Ms or candy of choice.
  •  

    Step 2: Backup your Files

    Windows 8 installation hard drive partitions
    Before you install Windows 8, back up all your files using Dropbox or your backup method of choice.

    Tip

    Backup your files to Dropbox to make sure that all of your personal files, documents, and photos stay secure during your upgrade.
  • Step 3: Using the Windows 8 Upgrade Assistant

    Windows 8 installation hard drive partitions
    Using the Windows 8 Upgrade Assistant, you’ll be prompted to check for compatibility. After you click on the Download Pro link, you’ll have the option to download a small “stub” installer. This little 5 MB file will run a compatibility check on your computer to tell you which programs will and won’t work with Windows 8.
    Windows 8 installation hard drive partitions
    When the check is complete, you’ll be prompted to review and decide what to keep. Since this is a new installation, not an upgrade to Windows 8, start your Windows 8 experience fresh, without any files from your current OS.
    Windows 8 installation hard drive partitions
    The Upgrade Assistant will recommend the version of Windows 8 that fits your PC. Select the version that is recommended as compatible. Isn’t it nice to know that there’s a good match?

    Take Note

    These steps guide you on how to install Windows 8 from a Windows windowsplatform (not from MS-DOS.)
  • Step 4: Purchase

    Windows 8 installation hard drive partitions
    Time to pay up. Simply fill in your billing information and select a payment method. Once payment is complete, you’ll be given a product key. Make sure to write this down, you’ll need it later. (Don’t worry if you forget, it’ll also be sent to your inbox.)
    Windows 8 installation hard drive partitions

    Tip

    Don’t forget to write down your product key and keep it in a safe place. You’ll need it during the install.
    Windows 8 installation hard drive partitions
    After your order is complete, the Windows 8 download will start, and the fun begins.

Wednesday, January 15, 2014

Personalizing Your Start Screen

Personalizing Your Start Screen

Screenshot of Windows 8Personalizing the Start screen
You'll probably spend a lot of time on your Start screen, so you may want to personalize it so that it suits your taste. In this lesson, we'll show you several different ways to personalize it, including changing the background image and color, rearranging appspinning apps, and creating app groups.

To View Your Personalization Settings:

  1. Hover the mouse in the lower-right corner to open the Charms bar, and then select the Settings charm.
    Screenshot of Windows 8Selecting the Settings charm
  2. Click Change PC settings.
    Screenshot of Windows 8Clicking Change PC settings
  3. Make sure Personalize is selected on the left side of the screen. Your settings will appear on the right side of the screen.
    Screenshot of Windows 8Personalization settings

To Change Your Lock Screen Picture:

  1. From your personalization settings, select Lock screen at the top of the screen.
  2. Select the desired picture from the list of thumbnails. Alternatively, you can click Browse to select one of your own pictures.
    Screenshot of Windows 8Selecting a lock screen picture
The lock screen will appear whenever your computer is locked, which happens automatically after a few minutes of inactivity. You can also lock your computer by clicking your account name and selecting Lock.
Screenshot of Windows 8Locking the computer

To Change Your Start Screen Background:

  1. From your personalization settings, select Start screen at the top of the screen.
  2. Select the desired background image and color scheme.
    Screenshot of Windows 8Changing the Start screen background
Windows 8 does not allow you to use one of your own photos as your Start screen background.

To Change Your Account Picture:

  1. From your personalization settings, select Account picture at the top of the screen.
  2. Click Browse.
    Screenshot of Windows 8Changing the account picture
  3. To use a photo in your SkyDrive, click on the desired SkyDrive folder. To select a folder on your computer, click the drop-down arrow at the top of the screen and select a different location.
    Screenshot of Windows 8Navigating to the desired folder
  4. When you have selected a photo, click Choose image.
    Screenshot of Windows 8Selecting an image

How To Reset a Windows 8 Password

Yes, you can reset your Windows 8 password. In fact, as long as you can closely follow the detailed instructions outlined below, it's not even that difficult.

The "hack" outlined below is harmless and works very well but it's not exactly Microsoft-sanctioned. Ideally you'd use a Windows 8 password reset disk to reset your Windows 8 password. Unfortunately, the only way to use one of those is if you had the forethought to create one before forgetting your password! I do recommend you make one as soon as you get back in (see Step 10 below).

Important: The Windows 8 password reset trick below only works if you're using a local account. If you use an email address to logon to Windows 8 then you're not using a local account, you're using a Microsoft account, and you should follow my How To Reset Your Microsoft Account Password tutorial instead.
Some other ways also exist to recover or reset a forgotten Windows 8 password, like using password recovery software. See my Help! I Forgot My Windows 8 Password! for the full list of ideas.
Follow these easy steps to reset your Windows 8 password:

Difficulty: Average

Time Required: Considering that there are several steps involved, it might take up to an hour to reset your Windows 8 password.
Applies To: You can reset your Windows 8 password this way no matter what edition of Windows 8 or Windows 8.1 you're using.

Here's How:
  1. Access Advanced Startup Options. In Windows 8, all of the important diagnostic and repair options available to you can be found on the Advanced Startup Options (ASO) menu.

    Important: There are six ways to access the ASO menu, all described in the link above, but some are only available if you can already get into Windows 8, which you can't do since you don't know the password. I recommend following Method 4, which requires that you have a Windows 8 setup disc or flash drive, or Method 5, which requires that you have, or create, a Windows 8 Recovery Drive. Method 6 works too, if your computer supports it.
     
  2. Touch or click on Troubleshoot, then Advanced options, and finally Command Prompt.
     
  3. Now that Command Prompt is open, type the following command:
    copy c:\windows\system32\utilman.exe c:\
    
    ...and then press Enter. You should see a 1 file(s) copied confirmation.
     
  4. Next, type this command, again followed by Enter:
    copy c:\windows\system32\cmd.exe c:\windows\system32\utilman.exe
    
    Answer with Y or Yes to question about the overwrite of the utilman.exe file. You should now see another file copy confirmation.
     
  5. Remove any flash drives or discs that you may have booted from in Step 1 and then restart your computer.
     
  6. Once the Windows 8 logon screen is available, click the Ease of Access icon at the bottom-left corner of the screen. Command Prompt should now open.

    What?! Command Prompt? That's right! The changes you made in Step 3 & 4 above replaced the Ease of Access tools with Command Prompt (don't worry, you'll reverse these changes in Step 11). Now that you have access to a command line, you can reset your Windows 8 password.
     
  7. Next you need to execute the net user command as shown below, replacing myusername with your user name, and mynewpassword with the password you'd like to begin using:
    net user myusername mynewpassword 
     
    For example, on my computer, I would execute the command like this:
    net user "Tim Fisher" a@rdvarksar3skarY 
     
    Note: You only need to use double quotes around your username if it happens to have a space in it.

    Tip: If you get a The user name could not be found message, execute net user to see the list of Windows 8 users on the computer for reference and then try again with a valid username. A System error 8646 / The system is not authoritative for the specified account... message indicates that you're using a Microsoft account to login to Windows 8, not a local account. See the Important call-out in the introduction at the top of this page for more on that.
     
  8. Close Command Prompt.
     
  9. Login with the new password you set in Step 7!
     
  10. Now that your Windows 8 password has been reset and you're back in, either create a Windows 8 password reset disk or switch your local account to a Microsoft account. No matter which you choose, you'll finally have legitimate, and much easier to use, Windows 8 password reset options.
     
  11. Finally, you should reverse the hack that makes this password reset trick work in Windows 8. To do that, repeat Steps 1 & 2 above.

    Once Command Prompt is open again, execute this command:
    copy c:\utilman.exe c:\windows\system32\utilman.exe
    
    Confirm the overwriting by answering Yes and then restart your computer.

    Note: While there's no requirement that you reverse these changes, it would be irresponsible of me to suggest that you don't. What if you need access to Ease of Access from the logon screen someday? Also, please know undoing these changes won't undo your password change so don't worry about that
Tags; How To Reset a Windows 8 Password, Windows 8, Windows 8 password rese, windows

Wednesday, December 25, 2013

dual-boot Windows 8 and Linux

How to dual-boot Windows 8 and Linux

get Windows 8 and Linux booting from the same machine without too much trouble. Ashton Mills explains.


windows 8
You’ll need this To its credit, Windows 8 adds much more than just the Modern UI. There’s the underlying changes for memory efficiency, graphics performance (particularly elements like images, for which the Modern UI heavily relies on) and of course, the range of system-wide improvements like more informative copy dialogues and the ever-so-sexy Task Manager.
It also revamped, for the first time, both the dreaded BSOD screen and in many ways, its reluctant partner: the Windows boot manager. Under the bonnet the Windows boot manager works much the same as it did in Windows 7, with the added difference that’s it’s a heck of a lot nicer to look at. No longer are you presented with merely an ASCII-based white-on-black boot menu, much like GRUB for Linux; instead, there’s a soft blue background with large icons and fonts that mimic the Modern UI — and it’s mouse driven to boot (HA! See what I did there?). Such that, for some of us here at APC, we actually prefer the look of Windows 8’s boot manager than the traditional Linux one, even if slightly prettified in distributions like Ubuntu.
So, while you can easily set up a dual-boot system by installing Windows 8 first and then Linux, you’ll be left with GRUB to manage your boot. If you prefer the look of the Windows 8 menu, here’s how to dual-boot Windows 8 and Linux using the Windows 8 boot manager.

Step 1: Installation order

Installing Windows 8 and Linux on the same system doesn’t change — always do Windows first and then Linux second. However, the only difference now is to install GRUB to the root partition (or a /boot partition, if you set one up) instead of the MBR of the hard drive. For example, you might configure your installation to look something like the diagram below.
When you do this, you initially won’t be able to boot to Linux once the installation finishes. This is fine, as we’ll fix that in a moment.
You can configure your installation to look something like this. 


Step 2: Install EasyBCD

Reboot and once Windows 8 has loaded, drop to the desktop and head to neosmart.net/EasyBCD. Click on ‘Register’ at the bottom of the page and optionally fill in your details if you’d like to help support EasyBCD. This isn’t necessary, though, and you can click ‘Download!’ to download EasyBCD whether you register or not.
EasyBCD has been around for some time and provides flexible control over the Windows Boot Configuration Data (BCD). This includes the boot menu, for which Windows is actually quite a capable tool. It’ll happily boot a range of Windows operating systems and much like GRUB, it can be configured to chain-load non-Microsoft operating systems — with a little help, anyway. One of the features of EasyBCD is the integration of both a GRUB boot image and GRUB chain-loader, allowing you to boot Linux from the Windows boot menu.
EasyBCD has been updated with Windows 8 support, making it a snap to use the new Windows 8 boot menu to boot both Windows and Linux.
The contents of the BCD loader for dual-booting Windows 8 and Linux.

Step 3: Chain-load GRUB

Start EasyBCD and back up the current BCD configuration file by clicking ‘BCD Backup/Repair > Backup Settings’. Next, click ‘Add New Entry’ and under the ‘Linux/BSD’ tab, click on the ‘Type’ field and choose ‘GRUB2’ (if using Ubuntu). Under the ‘Name’ field, change it to whatever distribution you’re using and for ‘Drive:’, set it to ‘Automatically locate and load’.
Hit ‘Add Entry’ and you’re done! If you click on the ‘View Settings’ button, you should see a new entry for your distribution or ‘NeoSmart Linux’ if you didn’t change the name.
Adding a new entry to boot Linux.
If you’re using another version of Linux, check to make sure which version of GRUB it’s using. If the original GRUB is being used, you’ll need to select ‘GRUB’ instead and, since it can’t be automatically located and loaded, set the partition you installed GRUB to in the ‘Drive:’ field. Later, if for whatever reason this isn’t working, you can try ticking ‘Use EasyBCD’s copy of GRUB’.
Finally, if you forgot to change the name for the entry or want to change it later, click ‘Advanced Settings’ and under the ‘Basic’ tab rename the entry before clicking ‘Save Settings’.
Naturally, you can also use EasyBCD to alter other boot menu settings such as reordering the list, setting the default operating system and changing the timeout. All of these can be found under the ‘Edit Boot Menu’ section. Don’t forget if you run into any problems, you can also restore your original Windows 8 boot menu settings from the ‘BCD Backup/Repair’ option.
And that’s it! Enjoy your dual-boot Windows 8 and Linux system with a more modern and cleaner boot time interface.

Other tips: Cheating Windows 8’s cheat

Once you have more than one operating system installed alongside Windows 8, you may notice some interesting behaviour with the way Windows 8 boots. When you’re presented with the boot menu, this isn’t a first step before choosing what operating system loads. As part of its changes to decrease boot times, Windows 8 actually loads in the background and the boot menu is more a formality: if you click to boot Windows 8, you’ll instantly be presented with the login screen; if you choose to load another operating system, your machine will reboot before loading into the other OS.
It’s a bit of a hack on Microsoft’s part to create the illusion of speed and while it doesn’t bother us too much (having SSDs for boot drives helps), you can bypass this behaviour with a neat little tool also made by NeoSmart: iReboot.
EasyBCD has an option to install iReboot under ‘Useful Utilities’, but we found this didn’t work. Instead, head to neosmart.net/iReboot to download and install the latest version.
Once installed, a tray icon will appear to you let choose from your boot menu what operating system you’ll load at your next boot, making it possible to reboot once to Linux, instead of twice when rebooting from Windows 8. Neat!

source ; apcmag.com

Tags : Windows, Windows 8, Linux, Microsoft, advantages of Microsoft Windows 8.1, Cheating Windows 8’s cheat,Install EasyBCD,Windows 8 and Linux booting,dual-boot Windows 8 and Linux,

Tuesday, December 24, 2013

Windows 8 Error Messages

Windows 8 error messages rarely describe what you did to cause the event or, even worse, how to fix the problem. Following are some of the most common Windows 8 error messages, notifications, and just plain confusing attempts at conversation. Find a message that matches what you’re experiencing and then read how to handle the situation as gracefully as Windows 8 will allow.

Would you like to install this device software?

windows 8 Meaning: Are you sure that this software is free from viruses, spyware, and other harmful things?
Probable cause: A window similar to the one shown appears when you try to install or update a driver for one of your computer’s parts.
Solutions: If you’re sure the file is safe, click the Install button. But if this message appears unexpectedly, or you think it may not be safe, click the Don’t Install button.

Do you want to save changes?

image1.jpg Meaning: You haven’t saved your work in a program, and your work is about to be lost.
Probable cause: You’re trying to close an application, sign out, or restart your computer before telling a program to save the work you’ve accomplished.
Solutions: Look in the window’s title bar for the program’s name. Then find that program on your desktop (or click its name on the taskbar to bring it to the forefront). Finally, save your work by choosing Save from the program’s File menu (or tab) or clicking the program’s Save icon. Don’t want to save the file? Then click Don’t Save to discard your work and move on.

How do you want to open this type of file?

image2.jpg Meaning: The dialog box appears when Windows doesn’t know which program created the file that you double-clicked.
Probable cause: Windows programs add hidden secret codes, known as file extensions, onto the ends of filenames. When you double-click a Notepad file, for example, Windows spots the file’s secret, hidden file extension and uses Notepad to open the file. But if Windows doesn’t recognize the file’s secret code letters, this error message appears.
Solutions: If you know what program created the mysterious file, choose it from the list of programs offered in the message. (Click More Options to see other programs, but those programs will rarely be able to open the file.)
If Windows doesn’t offer any valid suggestions, however, choose Look for an App in the Store. You may need to download or buy an app from Start screen’s Store app.

Malware detected: Windows Defender is taking action

image3.jpg Meaning: When the built-in Windows 8 antivirus program, Windows Defender, finds a potentially dangerous file on your computer, it lets you know with this message. Windows Defender then removes the file so it can’t harm your computer or files.
This particular notification looks identical on both the desktop and the Start screen; it always appears in the screen’s top-right corner.
Probable cause: A dangerous file — malware — probably arrived through e-mail, a flash drive, a networked computer, or a website. Windows is removing the file so it can’t do any harm.
Solutions: You needn’t do anything. Windows Defender has already caught and removed the evildoer.

Removable disk: choose what to do with removable drives

windows 8 Meaning: When this window appears, tell Windows what to do with the flash drive or memory card you’ve inserted into your computer.
Probable cause: You’ve just slid a flash drive (a stick of memory) into your computer’s USB port, or you’ve put a memory card, perhaps from a camera, into a card reader attached to your computer.
Solutions: Most of the time, you’ll click the Open Folder to View Files option. That lets you see your stored files and copy or move them to other folders in your computer. But you have three other options:
  • Speed Up My System (Windows ReadyBoost). Click this only if you plan on leaving the item permanently attached to your computer. On slower computers that need more memory, this option can speed them up.
  • Configure this Drive for Backup (File History). Click this to leave the item permanently attached to store backups. With a large flash drive, it works fine with File History.
  • Take no action. Clicking this simply gets rid of the message. To access the item later, open File Explorer from the desktop, and open the card from there.
    See the letter listed after Removable Disk in the message? That’s the letter of the drive Windows has assigned to your item.

Add your Microsoft account

windows 8 Meaning: You must sign in with a Microsoft account to perform several tasks in Windows 8. If you don’t have a Microsoft account, you’ll see this message. Microsoft accounts let you reap the most benefits from Windows 8.
Probable cause: You may have tried to use the Mail, People, Calendar or Messenger app, which all require a Microsoft account. You also need one to download an app from the Microsoft Store.
Solutions: Sign up for a free Microsoft account.

You don’t currently have permission to access this folder

windows 8 Meaning: If you see the dialog box shown here, it means Windows won’t let you peek inside the folder you’re trying to open. (The folder’s name appears in the message’s title bar.) A similar message appears when Windows won’t let you peek inside a file.
Probable cause: The file or folder belongs to somebody with a different user account.
Solutions: If you hold an Administrator account, you can open files and folders from other people’s user accounts by clicking Continue. If you don’t have an Administrator account, however, you’re locked out.
If an account holder wants to let others see inside the file or folder, he or she should copy or move the item into the Public folder.

Tag : Windows 8 , Windows ,  Windows 8 Error Messages, Windows Error Messages,programs

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