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Showing posts with label Windows 10. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Windows 10. Show all posts

Saturday, August 8, 2015

How to Clean Out Your Hard Drive in Windows 10

 How to Clean Out Your Hard Drive in Windows 10
Is your Windows 10 hard drive feeling a little crowded lately? You can clean your hard disk and improve speed by getting rid of files and moving data to other devices. Here are easiest ways to free up PC space quickly.

Empty the recycle bin

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Ah, the beloved old recycle bin. It’s nice to know that some things about Windows haven’t changed in a long time. Windows 10 still uses the recycle bin to hide all the files you want to throw away, and emptying it out can prove effective in freeing up extra space.
You can right-click on the recycle bin icon for the option to directly empty it. If you can’t find the icon, then head to the Start menu, go to Settings, select System, then go to Storage. You will be able to select local storage under This PC – look for and click Temporary files. This will bring up any locations for temporary files, including Recycle bin. Under Recycle bin, select Empty recycle bin, and confirm your decision. That’s all it takes!
Note: Emptying your recycle bin will only help to clean your Windows 10 hard disk if there’s a lot of stuff in that bin. When you first download Windows 10 – and long afterward, depending on your desktop habits – emptying the recycle bin may not affect your hard drive much at all. If you aren’t sure, take a peek inside your bin and see how full it is first. A few GBs worth of data can still make a difference.

Delete temporary files and downloads

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Remember how emptying the recycle bin took you through the Temporary files section? If you want to broaden your hard drive cleaning activities, then you can delete all temporary files. What exactly are you getting rid of here? Well, Windows temp files are used to manage document editing, some application processes, various printing tasks, and so on. These files are usually automatically deleted, but sometimes they hang on. Get rid of them all by selecting Delete temporary files in the Temporary files folders.
Another time files are automatically created occurs when you download anything from the Internet. These files pop up in your Downloads and tend to stick around – which means they can quickly stack up if you are downloading a lot of content to your Windows 10 desktop.
You can also find downloads in the Storage section of your desktop (Settings > System > Storage). Select This PC and go back to Temporary files. You can visit Downloads from this section. Select View downloads and delete any files that you no longer need by highlighting them in groups or individually. This is a great way to clear out space manually without accidentally deleting something that you’ll need later.

Uninstall apps

If you were really excited about all the Windows 10 apps and updates, you may have downloaded a few too many during the first honeymoon weeks with the new OS, leading to an eventual slow-down or lack of space for other content, especially on some of the smaller, lighter Windows devices (looking at you, Surface tablets). Some apps can take up a lot of space – the trick is finding which hog the most hard drive room, and which you can live without.
From the Start menu, go to Settings, select System, then select Apps & features. Here you can see all the apps downloaded. Windows 10 allows you to arrange them by various statistics – if you have a long list, arrange them by the amount of hard drive space they are taking up. See which apps are hogging the most data, and delete those that you can live without. Doublecheck that the app doesn’t have anything too valuable on it, then select it and choose Uninstall.

Change how you use OneDrive

OneDrive is a cloud service for Windows, so you would think that all the cloud data it uses would help free hard drive space, not take it up. This is true, except for one particular OneDrive feature – the ability to save files offline, which you may not even know that you are using.
Sometimes this is handy. If you are dealing with sensitive files or big projects with some sharp deadlines, it’s a good idea to have a backup. But if you are using OneDrive and automatically saving offline for every file and doc at work, school or home, then you probably wasting hard drive space.
Related: This is how OneDrive works in Windows 10
The OneDrive icon should be waiting on the right side of your taskbar (it may be lurking under the Show hidden icons arrow). Click on the cloud icon and choose Settings, then select the Choose folders tab. This will take you to all the files types that OneDrive is saving offline, and how much space each are taking up. Unselect all the OneDrive folders that you don’t absolutely need. Remember, you can still access all these files online at OneDrive.com, so you aren’t really losing anything.

Use your Xbox One

Microsoft platforms are growing increasingly interconnected, and the convergence is very apparent in Windows 10, which connects more freely to other Microsoft devices like the Xbox One game console. If you have an Xbox One, you can use it to help save some space by swapping out select apps and data.
Related: Xbox One to receive Windows 10 upgrade in late 2015
An Xbox One can hold 500GB of content, including a variety of network and music apps. You can stream content from the Xbox to your Windows 10 PC with just a few steps. This allows you store data on the game console and free up space on your PC, if you have content you only use while at home. Just remember to delete the data from your PC after you transfer it to the Xbox.

Use an external drive

From USB drives to full external hard drives, one of the simplest ways to clean up your hard drive on Windows 10 is moving extra data outside of your computer.
First, hook up a hard drive and make sure that it is properly formatted and ready for uploads. Dragging and dropping a file into the new drive will create a copy of the file, allowing you to erase the original.
However, you can also move large chunks of files at one time. Open your File Explorer on the taskbar and select all the files you want to move outside your PC hard drive. Once they are selected, go to the Home menu, select Move to, then select Choose Location. Pick your external drive from the list, and it will drop all files at that destinations – you don’t even have to erase anything afterward.

Thursday, August 6, 2015

How To Automatically Login In Windows 10

you can configure Windows 10 so that you are logged into your account automatically. This is great if you are the only person using your computer as it shaves valuable seconds off the startup process. If you're sick of typing your password, here's how to bypass Windows 10's login screen and log into your account automatically.

Unlike some tweaks, this particular tip does not require you to delve into the registry or fiddle with key system files. There is a built in feature that can be used to automatically log into a particular user account, but it's pretty well hidden -- you'd be forgiven for not spotting it on your travels through the operating system.
Hit the Start button, or press the Windows key, type netplwiz and then click the entry at the top of the list of search results. If you're feeling old-school, press the Windows key and R to bring up the Run dialog and execute the same command.

In the list of usernames that's displayed, select the entry for your account (if you see more than one that appears to be yours, opt for the one that's an Administrator). Uncheck the option labelled 'Users must enter a user name and password to use this computer'.

How To Automatically Login In Windows 10
When prompted, enter your password -- for what will be the last time -- confirm it, and then click OK. That's it. Once you restart your computer, you'll be automatically logged into your chosen account. Simple

Tuesday, August 4, 2015

How to Install Windows 10 on Your computer

Want to install Windows 10 on your computer? We’ve got you covered with the instructions, although it’s just like installing any other version of Windows.

UPDATE! If you want to clean install Windows 10 instead of just upgrading, you can follow our new and updated guide to clean installing Windows 10. We definitely recommend going that route.
Before you decide to upgrade your computer, you might want to decide whether or not you actually want to install Windows 10. It’s not necessarily right for everybody — there are still bugs and issues, and we really recommend that people hold off for a few weeks.
You should not install Windows 10 on your primary PC. Use a test computer or a virtual machine. If you absolutely must install Windows 10 on your regular computer, we highly recommend creating a system image of your entire computer in case you want to easily revert back.

Before You Install

Here's a couple of obvious points to consider before you head down the path of mucking about with your PC.

Windows 10 Technical Preview
First, make sure you have all your data backed up. Even if you’re careful with how and where you install the update, it’s still a good idea to have everything duplicated just in case anything goes wrong.
The update won’t be reversible, even with a recovery partition so make sure you have everything you need to re-install your original version of Windows – serial numbers, installation discs, etc.

Where to download the Windows 10 Technical Preview

Once you’re sure you have a PC that’s backed up and ready to have Windows 10 unleashed on it the next port of call is to download the upgrade.


How to Install Windows 10 on Your PCHere you’ll be signing up for the Windows Insider Program, which allows you to download and test out the software. You’ll need a Microsoft account – Hotmail, Outlook, etc – to login and you’ll need to agree to some terms and conditions along the way.
Now the next step is where you have to be a bit careful. Microsoft – for some bizarre reason – has sought to guide the user to download the upgrade version of the software, which will upgrade the very PC you’re using.
Don’t do this!

Even if you are planning to upgrade the PC you're using - i.e. it's already a spare - it still makes far more sense to download the installation separately in case something goes wrong and you have to start again. It really is a very silly way for Microsoft to have setup the preview website.
How to Install Windows 10 on Your PCInstead, head to the bottom of the upgrade page where it says “Looking for ISO files?”. Click on "Get the ISO files" and download the version that’s right for your machine. There are options for US and UK English, Chinese, and Portuguese as well as 32-bit or 64-bit versions. They're around 3-4GB so be prepared for a little bit of a wait.

How to Install the ISO

To get the Windows 10 Technical Preview onto your test PC you’ll need to either burn the ISO onto a disc or copy the files onto a USB drive.
Windows has built in burning capabilities these days so you can just use that - just insert a disc, right click on the ISO and select "Burn Disc Image". Or you can use your choice of burning software if you have something else installed - Nero or ImgBurn for instance.
For USB installs, if you have software that can read ISO files you can just copy the contents onto a USB drive or you can download and run the Windows 7 USB DVD Download Tool which will format the drive and copy the ISO to it for you.

What if I Don't Have a Spare PC or Hard Drive?

If you don't have any spare hardware on which to install Windows 10 Technical Preview but you don't want to upgrade your current Windows Install, you have a couple of options: install to a separate partition on your existing hard drive or install to a virtual machine.
To create a separate partition you'll need to resize your current partition. You can do this from the Disk Management tool - right click on My Computer and select "Manage". Just right click the disk partition you'd like to resize and select "Shrink Volume". Assuming you've got enough hard drive space you'll be able to shrink this partition and leave enough room for another Windows installation on the left over space - anything over about 10GB should be enough for a basic Windows 10 installation.
Once the original partition is shrunk click on the empty space left and select to create a new partition. Then, when you run the Windows installation make sure to select this new partition to install to.
Removing this new partition and getting back to your old installation can be a bit of a bind but that's for another article...
As for installing to a virtual machine, you can find a comprehensive guide here.

Installing the software

Once you’ve either burned your disc or copied the files to a USB drive, insert either into the PC you’d like to upgrade.
If you do have an old version of Windows - and haven’t elected to just upgrade direct from the website – you can start the installation from the desktop by just clicking setup.exe and following the instructions.
image: http://static.trustedreviews.com/94/00002e707/e825_orh616w616/10.jpg
How to Install Windows 10 on Your PCIf you don’t have a copy of Windows already on the machine you’ll need to boot from the disc or USB drive by changing the boot options in your motherboard’s BIOS.
Once booted, just follow the setup instructions. Behold a new world of "Live Tiles in the Start Menu? What's that all about?" awaits...

Get the latest build of Windows 10 Technical Preview now!

For those of you already rocking Windows 10, all you need to do is wait for the automatic update schedule to arrive and the update to the latest build with all the new fun features will happen of its own accord.
If you want to force the upgrade to happen straight away you need to go to PC Settings > Update & Recovery > Preview Builds > Check Now. You're looking for Build 9926.
The new update is essentially a fresh install so make sure any data you need is backed up. It will keep your personal files and attempt to reinstall comptible programs but it's not foolproof.

tags: computer, Windows, Windows 10,

Friday, November 7, 2014

How to partition your drive before installing Windows 10


How to partition your drive before installing Windows 10

So you're interested in trying out Windows 10? Well, you're in luck. Microsoft released a Technical Preview of the upcoming Windows operating system that is free for anyone to download and install. There are a few different options for getting Windows 10 on your device. You can simply install it on a secondary PC over your existing Windows operating system, you can use a virtual PC emulator to test it out or you can partition your hard drive and install it on your primary PC. This guide will show you how to do the last of the three.
While using a virtual PC to install Windows 10 may be easier, performance may take a hit because you are splitting your memory between two operating systems. Creating a hard-drive partition, which will split the hard drive into different storage volumes, will let you experience Windows 10 as it was meant to be. The best part about this method is that once it's all said and done, you can simply delete the partition and return your PC to normal.
How to partition your drive before installing Windows 10
Open the Control Panel, click on System and Security and select Administrative Tools. Double-click on Computer Management and under the Storage submenu, click Disk Management.
Right-click your primary drive (in most cases this will be theC volume) and select the Shrink Volume option from the list. If you are installing the 32-bit version of Windows 10 you will need at least 16GB, while the 64-bit version will require 20GB of free space. On my 700GB hard drive, I allocated 100GB to Windows 10, which should give me more than enough space to play around with the operating system. Remember that 1,000 megabytes is roughly equivalent to 1 gigabyte (technically it is 1,024MB to 1GB).
How to partition your drive before installing Windows 10
You should now see an "unallocated" amount of storage appear next to your C volume. Right-click it, select "New Simple Volume" from the list and click on the Next button. You can assign the drive any letter you please; I simply selected D. After clicking Next a third time, you will come to the Format Partition section. Make sure NTFS is selected for the file system and choose a name for the partition. I went with the name "Windows 10." Click Next one last time and then on Finished. You should now have a blank drive to install Windows 10 on.
Windows, windows 10, pc, computer, Computers, Microsoft, Windows 10
To get things back to normal, right-click the partition and select "Delete Volume" from the list. Then, right-click the C drive and select Extend Volume.

You can find a step-by-step guide for installing the Windows 10 Technical Preview on your PC by clicking this link. Just be sure that you are installing the preview on the newly partitioned drive; in my case that is the D drive. You don't want to install it on your primary C drive.

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